Radio: Wireless Voice of the Sea

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New Book by RadioUser Columnist Scott Caldwell

 

A Unique Approach to Communications History

Before the advent of wireless communications, a vessel could simply sail out of port and never be seen again. Their loved ones could only wait and hope that they would return safely.

This new book, by RadioUser History expert Scott Caldwell chronicles the development of wireless communication through the lens of prominent historical events. The sinking of the RMS Republic in 1909, demonstrated to the world that wireless could be utilised to save lives at sea. While the sinking of the RMS Titanic in 1912 reminded the world that technology could fail even though Marconi saved 705 survivors.

However, the function of wireless is not merely confined to saving lives at sea. It offers a multitude of roles in terms of international commerce, news reporting, and a strategic advantage for nations that possess the industrial infrastructure to exploit its technology.

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The rivalry between nations is also extensively chronicled throughout the 20th Century, from the tension between Marconi and Telefunken to the breaking of the Enigma code, and the Falkland’s Conflict of 1982.

This book will appeal to maritime and communications historians, radio operators, and the general reader by focusing on the personalities who made wireless into a reliable mode of communication that facilitated modern electronic devices networking the globe.