Haiku, Snow in Summer and Vietnamese Weather

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Chrissy Brand looks at some of the latest news and programmes across the broadcast bands.

Chrissy Brand looks at some of the latest news and programmes across the broadcast bands. She also touches base with an enthusiastic DX club in India and shares a reader's memories of the Voice of Vietnam.

 

 

The summer continues apace and there has been much of interest to hear on the broadcast bands, from specialist short wave broadcasts such as a broadcast to Antarctica to the gentler options on offer like Japanese haiku. I've always been a fan of NHK (Nippon Hōsō Kyōkai), Radio Japan's informative broadcasts. It may have escaped your notice that there is a regular programme dedicated to haiku (these are three-line poems, where the first and last lines have five syllables and the middle line has seven).

You can tune to NHK Radio Japan in Europe on 5975, 9860 and 11970kHz at 0500 UTC for a daily thirty-minute broadcast (Fig. 1). The Japan Through Haiku programme is aired on the first Thursday of the month and makes for a serene start to the day. The June edition covered haiku about midsummer and Japanese green plums (aoume) that are used for pickled plums, an alcoholic drink or syrup. The July edition included poems sent in by listeners, with some on the subject of hirune (a midday nap). If you miss it on the air, then you can always catch up online.

www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/radio/haiku

The annual BBC World Service broadcast to Antarctica, on what is Midwinter's Day there, took place on June 21st at 2130 UTC. It aired on 5985, 7360 and 9890kHz. Singer and broadcaster Cerys Matthews introduced the programme for the 38 people living there with the words "This is the BBC World Service in London calling Antarctica."

With her in the studio were British Antarctic Survey marine biologist, Terri Souster, and mechanic Jonny Yates. They had worked at the bases and spoke about the festivities, which take place each Midwinter. There were music requests, audio contributions from family members and brief messages from famous names including Brian Eno, Tim Peake and Lorraine Kelly; all in all, this was an almost ‘surreal’ broadcast.

The BBC World Service preview stated, "In each of the stations, base commanders rise early to cook breakfast for their staff and presents are exchanged. There are sports and, weather permitting, even a naked streak in the snow. Penguin warning: avert your eyes. After the feasting, staff will gather around a short wave set to listen to the broadcast."

If you missed this thirty-minute transmission, catch up on the BBC i-Player.

www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p06blwrc

 

Readers' Reports

Graham Smith noticed that World Harvest Radio, once one of the major broadcasters on the short waves, is not so prevalent nowadays. The broadcast on 5920kHz used to carry Rick Wiles with Trunews at 0100 UTC and the Harvest Show at about 0300 UTC. Now, however, Trunews has its own radio network, and the Harvest Show has finished. World Harvest Radio is down to just one hour, between 0000 and 0100 UTC, on 5920kHz.

Lionel Clyne heard IBC Radio at 1920 UTC on 6070kHz, broadcasting in Italian from Rohrbach Waal with a SINPO of 45333. He stated that it was one of the rare times that he has been able to pick up a station broadcasting at 25kW. He also enjoyed some delightful Greek music from Helliniki Radiophonia at 1838 UTC on 9420kHz.

Tony Stickells has been struggling to hear some parts of the band, due to RFI from a neighbour. This wiped out everything from DC to about 4MHz and it affected his medium wave DXing too.

However, he still totted up an incredible total of almost 900 short wave logs in June.

South America was coming in quite well with local stations using minimal power. However, at times these were very clear. From Camboriú in the Brazilian state of Santa Caterina, he heard religious station Radio Paz No Vale on 5939.8kHz at 0032 UTC. Tony pulled in some interesting stations from Africa as well, with Radio Deegaanka Soomaalida on 5940kHz from Jijiga in Somalia, broadcasting in Somali at 1915 UTC.

Also, in the 49-metre band, on 5950kHz at 0315 UTC, Dimtsi Woyane Tigray, from the Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa, was airing in the language of Tigrinya.

Closer to home, World Music Radio from Karup in Denmark is a regular signal on 5840kHz, which Tony heard at a little after 0030 UTC. If you haven't tuned in yet, I urge you to do so (Fig. 2). The station's playlist contains over 650 tropical world music tracks from countries like Angola to Bolivia and well beyond them. Among the many artists to be heard are Sofia Reyes, Claire Angel, Buju Banton, Katamanto Highlife Orchestra and La Mamba Negra.

At 0030 UTC, just along the band on 5850kHz, Radio Slovakia International was picked up from WRMI in Florida. Amongst the less frequently logged stations were Myanmar Radio in Burmese on 5985kHz at 2308 UTC and Adygeyan Radio from Krasnodar in Russia, broadcasting in Adygeyan on 6000kHz at 1804 UTC.

On 7270kHz at 0507 UTC, Tony picked up Dandal Kura Radio in Kanuri, transmitting from Issoudun in France. This station aims to bring peace and prosperity to the people of northeast Nigeria and the Lake Chad Basin. The station states that the local population, "have gone through one of the most complicated insurgencies in history. Our line-up of programmes includes entrepreneurship, counselling, human rights, listener feedback, health and reconnection which are pillars to the recovery, rehabilitation and reintegration efforts of the government and of humanitarian organizations."

Tony also enjoyed some time monitoring FM during the Sporadic E season (See the DXTV section in this issue).

I too was delighted with some of my FM catches in June, two Algerian stations in particular; Radio Batna (also known as Batna FM) on 88.1MHz and Chaîne 3 on 87.6MHz.

 

Voice of Vietnam

The pace of life in the 21st Century is hectic. We are constantly bombarded with news, views, dozens of musical genres and lifestyle opportunities. This comes via radio as well as in all forms of social media. It can result in forgetting radio's heritage, a past that has shaped so much of where the medium is today.

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In this context, I was pleased to hear from RadioUser reader Albert Ford. He was prompted to write after reading my musings on the magic of short wave (RadioUser, July 2018: 40-44). I included a vintage pennant from The Voice of Vietnam and its current schedule. Albert logged The Voice of Vietnam throughout June. Thanks to his archive, he recalled writing to them many years ago. On 15th July 1988, he logged them on or around the unusual frequency of 15008kHz (the station's official frequency for that time was 15010kHz) from 1903 to 1930 UTC with a SINPO of 44333. However, he did not receive a reply to his reception report.

However, a report for 14th May 1990 was more successful. Albert heard the station on 15010kHz from 1914 to 1930 UTC with an all-4 SINPO. He received a QSL card, broadcast schedule and paper pennant. Later that year, for a reception report of a broadcast heard on 19th December 1990, he received New Year greetings and a 1991 pocket calendar card (Figs. 3 and 4). Albert concluded that he had not checked his logbook for other notes but was pleased to know they are still on short wave. Perhaps he will soon have occasion to write in again.

The Voice of Vietnam began just after the end of World War II, in September 1945, with President Ho Chi Minh reading out the Declaration of Independence. I raise a toast to the fact that the Voice of Vietnam is still thriving and airs a good range of news, music and cultural programmes.

One of the many features I have enjoyed this summer was on the work of Du Thu Trang. As the station put it, "She is very familiar to Vietnamese people residing in France, through various cultural and art programs. She is the driving force behind the themed stamps depicting Vietnam's seas and islands, published by the French Post. The stamps help to promote Vietnam, its land and people to international friends."

The weekly Letterbox programme airs views and covers all kinds of miscellany about the country. For example, information on weather can be fascinating, when concerning a climate that is very different to your own. The monsoon season arrived in June and, "From July to September, large waves, which can be two to four metres high, are forecast to occur in waters off central and southern provinces, due to impacts of the southwest monsoon, while coastal northern provinces must also watch out for large waves from the northeast monsoon. This year will see about 13 storms and tropical depressions in the East Sea, with five storms forecast to directly affect Vietnam’s mainland."

I strongly encourage listeners to contact the station. Broadcasters like to hear from you and need to know and prove to the ‘bean-counters’ at their stations how they are making an impact in the world. Hence, an insufficient amount of correspondence from an audience may well lead to cuts in a station's services.

http://vovworld.vn

 

Ardic DX Club

The Ardic DX Club is based in India, and part of its mission is to create public awareness of short wave radio listening. Since 1999, it has published a regular Club Bulletin and other guides with tips and news. Monthly meetings are organised by President Jaisakthivel and Arun Kumar Narasimhan, an ardent short-wave radio listener (Fig. 5).

Some of the issues discussed in a recent meeting included the closure of short wave services including the BBC Tamil Service's ending short wave last year and Radio Veritas' closure of its short-wave service in June. On a more positive note, topics discussed were how to bring more youngsters into the DX hobby and the exchange of QSL cards.

The Ardic DX Club also has some useful materials, which can serve as an introduction to DXing. When you are next asked by friends who don't really understand why you spend so much time hunched over a bank of receivers in your radio shack, these words might come in handy: "As radio stations across the world broadcast programmes, one would get to learn about the various cultures and traditions followed in those countries. Language lessons (as heard on China Radio International and NHK Japan) provide an opportunity to learn a language free of cost. Radio stations in foreign countries also air good music of their country, this will give us an opportunity to get to know about music in other countries. Some radio stations provide QSL cards to listeners who write reception reports. There are QSL card collectors, and this is also helpful for philatelists as you can get the QSL card with stamps."

 

Log Contributors

GS = Graham Smith, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk. Sony ICF-SW600 and a telescopic antenna.

LC = Lionel Clyne, Faversham, Kent. Lowe HF-150, random wire or homemade loop.

OR - Owen Rutherford, London. Lowe HF-150 and a Wellbrook loop.

TS = Tony Stickells, Wrexham. SDRplay RSP2, AOR AR7030 and a 500ft long wire.

 

[Reading suggestion: Kern, A.L. (2018) The Penguin Book of HaikuEd.]

 

 

Short Wave Logs

 

UTC

kHz

Station and location

Language

SINPO

Initials

0031

5840

World Music Radio, Denmark

English

35444

TS

0032

5850

Radio Slovakia International (via WRMI)

English

35433

TS

0036

5040

Radio Habana, Cuba

English

35223

TS

0043

7290

IRRS (United Nations Radio), Săftica, Romania

English

55444

TS

0113

6070

CFRX (CFRB), Toronto, Canada

English

35333

TS

0136

9395

Radio Argentina Exterior via WRMI

English

45444

 

TS

0146

6050

HCJB Quito, Ecuador

Spanish

33223

TS

0208

9395

Radio Tirana via WRMI

English

35434

 

TS

0412

6145

Channel Africa, Meyerton, South Africa

English

35323

TS

0512

9860

NHK Radio Japan, Santa Maria, Vatican

English

55555

TS

0519

5975

NHK Radio Japan. Moosbrunn, Austria

English

55545

TS

0523

6155

Radio Austria International

German

45454

TS

0535

9700

Radio Romania International

English

45534

TS

1037

6085

Radio Mi Amigo, Kall-Krekel, Germany

English

45233

TS

1111

6005

Radio Slovakia International, Kall-Krekel, Germany

English

35233

TS

1112

6070

From the Isle of Music, Rohrbach Waal, Germany

English

35333

TS

1139

11905

Reach Beyond Australia

Indonesian

35313

 

TS

1411

9630

KBS World Radio, Kimjae, South Korea

English

35223

TS

1514

9515

KBS World Radio, Kimjae, South Korea

English

35323

 

TS

1520

15159

Radio Tamuzug, Talata-Volonondry

Sudanese Arabic

44233

LC

1525

12160

TWR India, Kishinev Grigoripol

Punjabi

45333

LC

1537

12085

Voice of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar

Japanese

44233

LC

1612

15245

Voice of Korea, Kujang, North Korea

French

45233

LC

1617

9730

Voice of Vietnam

English

43553

 

TS

1625

15105

TWR Africa, Manzini

Kirundi

44233

LC

1640

11910

Voice of America, Meyerton, South Africa

English

35423

TS

1747

12120

Radio Pilipinas, Tinang, Philippines

English

35555

TS

1753

6030

Radio Oromiya, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Oromo

35333

TS

1805

6065

Voice of Hope Africa, Lusaka, Zambia

English

33333

TS

1805

11735

Zanzibar Broadcasting Corporation, Dole

English

44334

TS

1810

9400

End Times Coming Radio, Bulgaria

English

35534

 

TS

1825

9810

Bible Voice, Moosbrunn, Austria

English

54233

LC

1838

9420

Helliniki Radiophonia, Aviss, Greece

Greek

54444

LC

1845

13580

Radio Bangladesh Betar

English

45544

TS

1910

6185

Radio Taiwan International, Woofferton, UK

German

55555

LC

1911

9755

KNLS New Life, Madagascar

Russian

45444

 

TS

1913

9875

Voice of Korea, Kujang, North Korea // 11635

English

23233

OR, TS

1914

9920

Radio Thailand

English

35434

TS

1915

6080

Voice of America

English

35544

GS

1920

7255

Voice of Nigeria

English

42533

TS

1920

6070

IBC Radio, Rohrbach Waal

Italian

45333

LC

1924

7550

All India Radio

English

45444

 

TS

1926

6165

KBS World, South Korea, Woofferton, UK

French

55455

LC

1945

7210

Voice of Korea, Kujang, North Korea

English

42333

TS

1946

9800

IRIB WS, Sirjan, Iran // 9810

English

35333

TS

2000

7360

Vatican Radio // 9705

English

45344

 

OR, TS

2017

6195

Voice of America, Botswana

English

44344

TS

2034

9620

Voice of Turkey

English

44333

 

TS

2041

7220

Voice of Vietnam, Hanoi

English

42333

 

TS

2052

6170

Radio Romania International

English

55545

TS

2109

13840

Radio New Zealand International

English

35223

TS

2115

5930

Radio Koran, Algeria

Arabic

55555

GS

2116

6040.7

Radio RB2, Curitiba, Brazil

Portuguese

25233

TS

2210

7315

Radio Romania International // 7325

English

55555

OR, TS

2214

9780

PBS Qinghai, Xian, China

Chinese

35223

TS

2216

6060

Sichuan RGD Xinwen Guangbo, Chengdu, China

Chinese

35333

TS

2217

9830

TRT Voice of Turkey

English

45544

TS

2337

6134.8

Radio Santa Cruz, Bolivia

Spanish

33333

TS

 

 

This article was featured in the September 2018 issue of Radio User